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The Exilva Blog

The leading blog on nanocellulose

Coatings, adhesives/sealants

A way to reach prolonged stability of starch adhesives

10. March 2020

Starch is a natural polymer found in many processes either as an adhesive or a thickener. Following paper production, corrugated board is the second largest application of non-food starches globally, where it it used as an adhesive between the fluting and liners. The control of the adhesive viscosity during process and storage is critical. However, despite further developments regarding the formulation of starch adhesives, the viscosity is commonly not stable enough over extended periods of time, in particular over weekend storage. In this first of a series of blog posts with the corrugated boards application as the example, I will give an introduction to this problem, and the new technology of Exilva, a microfibrillated cellulose, to solve it.

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13. November 2018

Important rheological properties of Exilva microfibrillated cellulose

Rheology is the study of deformation and flow of material under stress, for example how easily material changes its form when it is pressed, or how easy it is to pump liquid in the pipes. Yield stress and viscosity are two importance aspects in the study of rheology and I will today exemplify this by using the Exilva microfibrillated technology. 

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23. October 2018

How to compare rheology additives: The example of nanocellulose/cellulose fibrils and HASE

For decades, producers of fluid materials have used HASE as the fundamental technology to control flow. How can new technologies complement this work horse of rheology modification? This week I am trying to uncover the key aspects of the HASE technology and give you ideas on the HASE technology in relation to the world I am familiar with: nanocellulose and cellulose fibrils. 

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16. October 2018

How to compare rheology additives: the example of nanocellulose/Cellulose fibrils and HEUR

As a researcher, to have an overview of the alternatives available in your area of profession is of importance. In the landscape of rheology, new alternatives are emerging. In my short review today, I will grasp on the subject of similarities and potential synergies between two of the candidates you should note down: nanocellulose and hydrophobically modified ethoxylated polyurethanes (HEUR). Here are my hints and tips  on how to understand these two technologies better.

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9. October 2018

[VIDEO] Topic tuesday: Sag vs. leveling. Can you handle 'em both?

A fast viscosity recovery is good, and some times crucial, but that would also affect the leveling, right? In this weeks Topic Tuesday, we discuss how you can cope with the issue of getting fast recovery - and avoid sag - while getting your coating layer in level. We may also have some exciting ideas for you if you have problems with cracking. 

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28. August 2018

3 great ways to exploit the large surface area of cellulose fibrils

One of the benefits of highly fibrillated cellulose fibrils is its very high surface areaWhen the fibers are torn down to smaller and smaller fibrils, the surface area consequently increases, which leads to new properties and applications. Learn how its extreme water binding capacity, among other properties, may take your product to a new efficiency level. 

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14. August 2018

How to counteract formulation settling issues

Everyday life is full of formulations containing solid particles, pigments, beads or fillers. Depending on the application, the formulations may have a varying amount of solids. Common challenges with high solid content formulations are the settling of heavy particles or the floating of lighter ones. Therefore, it is important to ensure the stability of the solids suspended in a formulation. Especially those with high particle loading such as a coating formulation with matting agents, UV filters and other solids.

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31. July 2018

Why do we use microspheres when formulating paints?

Paint formulators face many challenges in today’s market, and are continuously in search of new innovative raw materials to satisfy the needs of their customers. In an effort to reduce cost, improve technical properties, and fulfill more stringent environmental regulations, chemists have started to look toward a class of products known as microspheres.

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24. July 2018

My coating is seeing blocking issues; but what’s my option dealing with it?

A familiar problem for producers of coatings and polyolefins is what literature calls blocking. When blocking occurs, it is the coatings ability to create adhesion to itself that causes the problems. There are many available technologies for avoiding this, in which some are synthetically derived, and others are derived directly from nature. Could a bio-based alternative give you the effect you are looking for? If you are looking for some ideas, this is the blog post to read.

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26. June 2018

How to use and understand cellulose fibrils? The practical experience from Covestro

Our blog post of the week is today a really exciting one! We have been so fortunate to interview Peter Küker, who is a technical manager at Covestro in Germany. Peter has been working with cellulose fibrils in a project at Covestro for some time, and today he is sharing his views and experience on utilizing the fibrils in some of the Covestro formulations for adhesives. Don't miss out on this opportunity to learn more about the actual experience of utilizing the effect from the fibrils on rheology, dispersion and material handling.

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22. May 2018

Trouble with cracking during drying of your coating, adhesive, putty or other products?

One of my favorite characteristics of the cellulose fibrils is its behavior when drying or involved in the drying process of a product system. I have learned through some of our conducted tests that cellulose fibrils can act in an interesting and often beneficial way towards obtaining desired end product characteristics. Most of the examples on how the fibrils influence the drying are related to coatings. I however believe that similar behavior is possible to observe in application areas where a tight control of dry-out properties is desired. Evaporation of solvents is often the main technique for drying in many applications. I will therefore focus my blog post this time on this specific drying technique. Let me share some very interesting insights into why cellulose fibrils are improving the products upon drying.

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