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The Exilva Blog

The leading blog on nanocellulose

Coatings, adhesives/sealants

Why Microfibrillated Cellulose can enable you to formulate paints with less expensive microspheres

1. October 2019

Paint manufacturers have been formulating paints containing microspheres in many years. Formulators can use microspheres to increase the solid content of a coating while maintaining the proper application and flow characteristics. Higher solids can reduce volatile organic compounds (VOCs), shrinkage and drying time. But there can be problems with settling and sedimentation, as well as floating of the microspheres. In addition, cost of certain types of microspheres can be high. In this article I will show you how the microfibrillated cellulose technology can give anti-settling and anti-sedimentation of microspheres, as well as enabling you to choose less expensive microspheres and obtain the same performance, which typically has been associated with more expensive types.

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1. October 2019

Why Microfibrillated Cellulose can enable you to formulate paints with less expensive microspheres

Paint manufacturers have been formulating paints containing microspheres in many years. Formulators can use microspheres to increase the solid content of a coating while maintaining the proper application and flow characteristics. Higher solids can reduce volatile organic compounds (VOCs), shrinkage and drying time. But there can be problems with settling and sedimentation, as well as floating of the microspheres. In addition, cost of certain types of microspheres can be high. In this article I will show you how the microfibrillated cellulose technology can give anti-settling and anti-sedimentation of microspheres, as well as enabling you to choose less expensive microspheres and obtain the same performance, which typically has been associated with more expensive types.

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23. July 2019

Exilva Microfibrillated Cellulose & Polyurea: anti-settling & anti-sedimentation because of yield stress

Modified polyurea and Exilva Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) can both be used as rheology modifier in a variety of industries to prevent sedimentation and settling. In this article, I review the ability of the materials to give a yield stress in a waterbased system and, because of that, provide anti-settling & anti-sedimentation behavior. Tune-in on a comparison between these two rheology additives.

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9. July 2019

Exilva Microfibrillated Cellulose & Clay Platelets: anti-settling & anti-sedimentation because of yield stress

Clay (including montmorillonite and bentonite) additives and Exilva microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) have a lot in common since they both can be used as rheology modifier in different industries. However, there are also clear differences. In this article, I will review the ability of the materials to provide yield stress and subsequent anti-settling & anti-sedimentation benefits. Tune-in on a comparison between two of the most potent anti-settling & anti-sedimentation additives available.

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11. June 2019

Exilva Microfibrillated Cellulose vs. Fumed silica: anti-settling benefits from effective yield stress

Exilva microfibrillated cellulose and fumed silica are both used for controlling the rheology of liquid systems, such as anti-settling and anti-sedimentation. But when we are comparing the two technologies, we also see differences. In this article, we will show you how the microfibrillated cellulose and fumed silica builds yield stress, and how they consequently can give good anti-settling and anti-sedimentation benefits.

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11. April 2019

Sedimentation Stability: The Importance of Yield Stress and Storage Modulus

Sedimentation of solid particles in liquid materials, like paints and inks, is caused by gravitational force pulling particles of high density down. In the worst case, sedimentation can result in settling, the formation of a hard layer of solid material on the bottom of the can. How to avoid this?

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29. January 2019

Why cellulose fibrils (microfibrillated cellulose) will make a difference in coatings

Coating performance is often very complex, and can depend on the coating system itself, substrate to be coated, conditions during coating etc. Increasing the performance is often a lengthy process with multiple tests on wet paint performance and dried coating performance. Key aspects of wet paints can be control of rheology, and for solid coatings the ability to improve endurance. Are there technologies available for aiding on the key aspects? For sure. Are there new sustainable additives which can improve the new water borne technologies? Let me show you an example of exactly that in this blog post.

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4. December 2018

Three reasons why water-borne product systems are taking over

You may have noticed that the number of waterborne systems has increased massively during the past decade. Waterborne systems, like paint and adhesives, where water is the main part of the product in many cases, are popular due to several factors. My goal with this article is to introduce you to what I believe are the three most significant aspects of the increased demand for waterborne product systems, focusing on coatings and adhesives.

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13. November 2018

Important rheological properties of Exilva microfibrillated cellulose

Rheology is the study of deformation and flow of material under stress, for example how easily material changes its form when it is pressed, or how easy it is to pump liquid in the pipes. Yield stress and viscosity are two importance aspects in the study of rheology and I will today exemplify this by using the Exilva microfibrillated technology. 

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23. October 2018

How to compare rheology additives: The example of nanocellulose/cellulose fibrils and HASE

For decades, producers of fluid materials have used HASE as the fundamental technology to control flow. How can new technologies complement this work horse of rheology modification? This week I am trying to uncover the key aspects of the HASE technology and give you ideas on the HASE technology in relation to the world I am familiar with: nanocellulose and cellulose fibrils. 

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16. October 2018

How to compare rheology additives: the example of nanocellulose/Cellulose fibrils and HEUR

As a researcher, to have an overview of the alternatives available in your area of profession is of importance. In the landscape of rheology, new alternatives are emerging. In my short review today, I will grasp on the subject of similarities and potential synergies between two of the candidates you should note down: nanocellulose and hydrophobically modified ethoxylated polyurethanes (HEUR). Here are my hints and tips  on how to understand these two technologies better.

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